Another poetic experiment–Alternating rhymed and blank verse: “A Gift from Nature”

This morning, it occurred to me (as I thought of all the chores I need to do by travelling a short distance, and which I’m loathe to do because of bad weather) that a seasonal poem for the Northeast U.S. might not come amiss.  As well, as I’ve been trying to break once again into blank verse (metered but unrhymed) and  free verse forms (both unmetered and unrhymed), I decided to try to alternate blank verse and rhymed verse in a poem in which the weather seems to dictate the form a bit.  Here’s what I came up with:

A Gift from Nature

Chill frost is at the window
And snow is in the yard
The temperature has dropped so far
That even air is hard.

We breathe it in, we creep through it
Though it won’t buoy us up
And all of our conclusions:
Predestined, unsurprised.

Our forward strides go backward
Our fate is all awry
And yet it is not in our grasp
To ask our Maker why.

We churn and weave, we flap our arms
To warm us in the day
Though constant indications
Point out our helplessness.

When will the weather break, O
Why don’t we all move South?
But there’s not room for all of us
Down in the furnace mouth.

We pitch and climb, o’er crevices
And mounds and heaps of snow
There’s only hope it will end
On some appointed day.

But we can search the message
Contained in “temperate zone,”
Which often proves intemperate
As we complain and moan.

Praise be for consternation’s fit
That trains us how to fight
And may each one’s Penates
See him well through the night.

©Victoria Leigh Bennett, 1/9/17

As experiments go, so this one went.  Others may judge of the success, or the lack thereof.

 

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3 Comments

Filed under Full of literary ambitions!, Poetry and its forms and meanings

3 responses to “Another poetic experiment–Alternating rhymed and blank verse: “A Gift from Nature”

  1. I loved the lines:

    Why don’t we all move South?
    But there’s not room for all of us
    Down in the furnace mouth.

    I always wonder what a winter on the coast would be like, it seems like one of those things only locals do whilst everybody else goes inland and reads books about it.

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